Fall, Starters & Sides, Vegetarian
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Moroccan Spiced Roast Carrots, Potatoes and Chickpeas with Bulgur

Moroccan Spiced Roast Carrots, Potatoes and Chickpeas with Bulgur

With winter around the corner I am always looking for new ways to enjoy vegetables. And being a fan of roasted anything, I wanted to add a little more pep to standard roasted veggies, which is why I came up with this recipe for Moroccan spiced roast carrots, potatoes and chickpeas. And because this is a recipe for “Moroccan spiced” vegetables, it naturally calls for mix of spices — six to be exact. There’s CUMIN (love it), CINNAMON (cause believe it or not, it goes great with vegetables), PAPRIKA (it’s my choice over the vegetable itself), ground CORIANDER (what’s not to love?), and SUMAC (one of my favorites because I love all things lemony) and ALLSPICE. So take that, some vegetables, roast it all together and serve it bulgur and a lemony herb yogurt sauce and you have a tasty vegetarian meal to satisfy you even in the coldest of winter nights.

Carrots, potatoes, onions

Mixed Spices

Moroccan Spiced Dressing

Moroccan Spiced Roast Carrots, Potatoes and Chickpeas with Bulgur

Moroccan Spiced Roast Carrots, Potatoes or any vegetable you choose — go ahead, use your favorite!

I choose to stick with a standard mix of carrots, onions and potatoes, but actually you could easily switch these out for your favorite choice of vegetables. I’m thinking a mix of sweet potatoes and red peppers, or cauliflower and potatoes or even carrots with pumpkin. Which I guess means, this could be considered a clean out your fridge and pantry recipe. :-)

Moroccan Spiced Roast Carrots, Potatoes and Chickpeas with Bulgur

Moroccan Spiced Roast Carrots, Potatoes and Chickpeas with Bulgur

Moroccan Spiced Roast Carrots, Potatoes and Chickpeas with Bulgur

Moroccan Spiced Roast Carrots, Potatoes and Chickpeas with Bulgur

Cold potatoes have benefits

In case you are thinking about enjoying this Moroccan spiced roast carrots, potatoes and chickpeas recipe cold (aka as leftovers), well there’s a pretty cool fact about cold potatoes that might get you grooving on things like potato salads. I mean weight loss cool. Let me explain. Well, when potatoes are cooked and then left to cool down, they form a firm texture, which is due to the resistant starch forming. And what happens when you eat resistant starch, is that makes you feel fuller for longer than when you eat hot potatoes. So you’re not going to get hit with that hunger attack a little later. So yay to potato salads, right? But there’s more…↓

Moroccan Spiced Roast Carrots, Potatoes and Chickpeas with Bulgur

Resistant starch is also known as a prebiotic

In a nutshell, prebiotics are a type of fiber that act as a fertilizer for the good bacteria in your gut. And the more efficiently the live bacteria work, the healthier your gut will be. And that bacteria, known as the microbiome, is what regulates our weight and mood. AND it also signals to our body to eat what it needs. Which why it is so important that it is in balance. If not, it we can feel cravings and our metabolism can be affected (not to mention, those bad mood signals! — hello second brain). This is why feeding the your body — and the good bacteria — the right stuff is so important. So go ahead and enjoy this recipe when it cools down to room temperature. Not only is it delicious, but it will keep your cravings under control and make you feel happier too. :-)

Moroccan Spiced Roast Carrots, Potatoes and Chickpeas with Bulgur
 
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A simple recipe for Moroccan spiced roast carrots, potatoes and chickpeas with bulgur and herbed yogurt. Makes a delicious and seasonable side dish for Christmas dinner. Naturally vegetarian and gluten-free. Easily made vegan-friendly.
Author:
Recipe type: Side Dish, Vegetarian Main
Serves: 4 (more if served as a side)

INGREDIENTS:
For the spice mix:
1 tablespoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon paprika (sweet)
1 teaspoon ground coriander
1 teaspoon sumac (see tips below)
1/4 teaspoon allspice
4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
2 tablespoon red wine vinegar
sea salt and pepper, to taste

For the vegetables:
500 g carrots, peeled and chopped into chunks (about 3 large)
4 small yellow onions, peeled and quartered
500 g new potatoes, scrubbed and cut in half lengthwise (or quartered, depending on size)
1 x 400 g can organic chickpeas, rinsed and drained
fresh flat-leaf parsley or cilantro, to garnish
1/2 cup uncooked bulgur (100 g)

For the yogurt sauce:
300 g Greek yogurt
2 teaspoons finely grated lemon zest (from an organic lemon)
2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice
2 handfuls fresh mint or flat-leaf parsley (I use a mix), finely chopped
sea salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

METHOD:
1. Preheat oven to 400˚F / 200˚C and line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

2. In a small bowl, mix together the spice mix.

3. Spread out the carrots, potato, onions and chickpeas on a baking tray lined with parchment paper.

4. Pour the oily spice mix over the tray of vegetables. Mix well with your hands to coat the vegetables evenly, then spread them out as evenly as possible.

5. Roast for 30 minutes, remove from the oven and flip/stir all the vegetables around and return to the oven and roast for 20-25 more minutes.

6. Meanwhile prepare the bulgur (according to package instructions). Cook in a 2:1 ratio water to bulgur. Bring it to a boil. Cover, reduce heat, and simmer for 10 minutes or until tender. Drain, if necessary. Cover and set aside.

7. While the bulgur cooks, mix together the yogurt, lemon zest, lemon juice and fresh herbs in a small bowl. Season with salt and pepper and set aside.

8. Remove the baking sheet with the roast carrots, potatoes and chickpeas from the oven and let cool for a couple minutes. Add the cooked bulgur and toss to combine. Sprinkle over a good squeeze of lemon juice (plus a drizzle of olive oil, if desired) and garnish with parsley.

9. Divide into bowls and serve with an extra wedge of lemon and the yogurt sauce. Enjoy!

TIP: If you don’t have sumac on hand then it can be omitted. I use it in this recipe to add a a subtle lemony tang to the roasted vegetables. It’s less tart than lemons and has a more balanced flavor, which makes it also great for adding to dressings or sprinkling on salads. It can be found in Middle Eastern shops, specialty spice shops or online. Otherwise, you can substitute sumac with a little finely grated lemon zest and a pinch of salt.

If you like a light touch of spiciness with your vegetables, then feel free to add 1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper to the spice mix.

For a vegan-friendly version of this Moroccan Spiced Roast Carrots, Potatoes and Chickpeas recipe, omit the yogurt sauce and instead serve it with a side of hummus or baba ganoush.

If you make this Moroccan Spiced Roast Carrots, Potatoes and Chickpeas recipe, I’d love to hear how it turned out for you! Be sure to rate it and leave a comment below to let me know! Especially if you have tips for other readers. Or take a picture and tag me on Instagram @ellerepublic and don’t foget to hashtag #ellerepublic so I don’t miss it!

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